Test #007: Increasing the Force of a Free Content Offer's Value Proposition


PARTNER: TED'S BRAIN SCIENCE PRODUCTS
COMPANY TYPE: PAIN-RELIEF, HEALTHCARE, ECOMMERCE
EXPERIMENT QUESTION: IF WE ADD A LONGER DESCRIPTION IN OUR FACEBOOK AD THAT ELABORATES ON THE CONTENT OFFER'S TOPIC, CAN WE INCREASE THE FORCE OF THE VALUE PROPOSITION AND INCREASE AD CLICKTHROUGH RATE?


Introduction:

Ted's Brain Science Products is a Dallas-based healthcare company that specializes in developing pain relief solutions. They found that two natural ingredients–methyl salicylate from the wintergreen plant, and resveratrol from grape leaves or Japanese knotweed–appear to work together in a brand new, previously unknown way. There flagship product, Ted's Pain Cream, is the first of it's kind.

Ted's Brain Science Products recently launched a content offer as a part of their Facebook Advertising approach. This free content download explains how chronic pain works while highlighting Ted's unique findings. As we reviewed our ad clickthrough performance, we wondered: Will adding a longer description that elaborates on the topic of pain increase clickthrough rate?

 
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Control

This is the existing eBook offer Facebook ad. We created a 3D graphic that shows the book, with a image headline of 'Free eBook Download.' We kept the supporting copy short:

Control: 6,924 people reached, 378 clicks (5.46% Clickthrough Rate)

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
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Treatment

This is the new treatment version of the eBook offer Facebook ad. You'll notice that everything except the supporting copy has stayed the same. In the supporting copy, we added a few paragraphs introducing the topic to the viewer. Here are the results observed for the treatment page:

1172 visitors, 105 clicks (8.96% Clickthrough Rate)


RESULT:VALID; 64% INCREASE IN CLICKTHROUGH RATE


 

Analysis: 

This experiment crossed the 95% confidence threshold, showing a statistically significant 64% increase in clickthrough rate.

It's clear that the additional copy had a strong influence on viewers and successfully increased the force of the value proposition. Before, viewers had little supporting copy to reference before deciding if this is an offer they would be interested in or not. Now, viewers can get a comprehensive look at the topic being discussed in the offer and decide if it's relevant to them. 

Concluding thoughts: 

Often we're encouraged by ad platforms and 'experts' to keep our copy short, or viewers will scroll past without reading. This experiment shows that it's important to put our intuition to the test. It's clear that adding additional value into this Facebook advertisement paid off big by increasing our total traffic and decreasing our overall cost per download.

Grant Klembara