Test #006: Reducing Friction While Localizing A Service Offering


PARTNER: SOURCED CRAFT COCKTAILS
COMPANY TYPE: FOOD & BEVERAGE, PERSONALIZED SERVICE
EXPERIMENT QUESTION: IF WE DECREASE THE NUMBER OF SECONDARY LINKS AND COLUMNS ON THE PAGE, AND HIGHLIGHT THE LOCALITY OF THE SERVICE, CAN WE DECREASE FRICTION & ANXIETY AND INCREASE 'REQUEST A QUOTE' RATE?


Introduction:

Sourced Craft Cocktails is an Austin-based cocktail delivery service, serving the Austin, Dallas, and Los Angeles markets. They work with clients to create custom cocktails that help them tell a story behind their event, and their focus is on making memorable experiences. Be Whatever the type of event, they source all the materials needed, so that the end consumer can enjoy a high-quality cocktail without the hassle of going to five different stores to find ingredients and then trying to get proportions right.

Potential clients for Sourced can 'Request a Quote' for their event on their 'Request a Quote' landing pages (or, on their site here). After reviewing their existing 'Request a Quote' page for the Dallas area, we noticed that there were a lot of opportunities for visitors to click away from the page. We also found that the page didn't really show anything related to Dallas. We wondered: Will decreasing the number of secondary links and columns on the page while highlighting the locality of the service in Dallas increase the 'Quote Request' rate? 

 

 
screencapture-discover-tedsbrainscience-products-pain-cream-a-html-2018-04-16-10_16_17 (1).png

Control

This is the existing 'Request a Quote' Dallas Page used by Sourced. This 2-column page contains a form on the left and a selection of 'Bar Packages' on the right. Here are the results observed for the control page:

Control: 365 visitors, 5 conversions (1.37% 'Quote Request' Rate)

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
screencapture-try-sourcedcraftcocktails-dallas-b-html-2018-04-13-12_14_31.png

Treatment

This is the new treatment version of the Sourced 'Request a Quote' Dallas Page. We reduced this page to a single-column format, while adding in some imagery to show the process. We also added a Dallas Skyline image to the header to make this page more city-specific. Here are the results observed for the treatment page:

343 visitors, 12 conversions (3.5% 'Quote Request' Rate)


RESULT:VALID; 155.4% INCREASE IN CONVERSION


 

Analysis: 

This experiment crossed the 95% confidence threshold, showing a statistically significant 155.4% increase in requested quotes.

This experiment is a good example of taking learnings from one experiment and applying them to another situation to achieve a similar result. We've seen a couple of times now that (a) reducing the number of secondary links and (b) reducing the page to a single-column format. The single column approach, especially, seems to improve the user performance on mobile by creating a more cohesive experience.

It's likely that the addition of the headline "Craft Your Story Through Cocktails, And Make a Great First Impression," increase the force of Sourced's value proposition in the eyes of the user. Before, the 'Request a Quote' page did little to explain why anyone should use Sourced in the first place. By helping guide the visitor's thoughts towards a reason for using the service, we can get them to say 'yes' in their head before saying 'yes' by filling out the form.

We also attempted to increase the incentive of filling out this form by adjusting and emphasizing the secondary call-to-action. By filling out the form now, we promise to immediately begin building their custom quote." By focusing on the value delivered, we can show that the value of a customized quote outweighs the cost of their time and information in filling out the form. 

It's also possible that the presence of the Dallas skyline image decreased anxiety for the visitor by immediately addressing and supporting the locality of their request. Before introducing this element, there was no design difference between the Dallas/Los Angeles/Austin pages, other than the user of the cities' name. 

Concluding thoughts: 

This experiment reinforces a previous discovery that limiting the number 'click-away' options can help increase conversion. Often, users will decide within the first second of visiting a page if they're planning on staying. There a number of different factors that impact their decision to say 'yes' to staying. It appears that "frictionless design" is an important one to consider. 

This test also shows the importance of reinforcing the user's 'local request' through imagery and copy, as well as reminding them why they are visiting this page in the first place. Further tests will show which of these particular elements has the greatest impact on conversion.

Grant Klembara